Afropunk Returns To London The special thing about Afropunk is that it doesn’t let you forget the diversity among your people

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Afropunk is one of the most diverse festivals on the circuit – it’s grown in leaps and bounds since its beginnings in Brooklyn 12 years ago. The Afropunk mantra is very inclusive.

It’s a place to relax, enjoy the creative energy and patronise the stalls, where you can buy everything from jewellery to art.

On top of all that, the musical offerings are a dream. With so many performers packed into the two days.

Last weekend, The Printworks hosted the second edition of Afropunk London and it was amazing.

Picture bright blue afros and crisp fades, long colourful braids and shaved heads. Kente trousers, ankara crop tops, leather jackets paired with ‘90s prints, Vivienne Westwood trousers matched with a shirt picked out by mum back in Nigeria, Afro-futuristic jewellery set off by block colour head wraps.

The lineup reflected Afropunk’s dedication to showcasing the variety and talent of black artists.

Among the acts were JME, Nadia Rose, Nao, Lianne La Havas, Willow Smith and Corinne Bailey Rae.

Afropunk also brought together several collectives of black women who have been carving out spaces for people of colour to celebrate, and express themselves. There were DJ sets from members of gal-dem, an online magazine for and by women of colour and Born N Bread, a collective of friends from south London who throw some of the best nights out in the capital.

Afropunk also brought together several collectives of black women who have been carving out spaces for people of colour to celebrate, and express themselves.

There were DJ sets from members of gal-dem, an online magazine for and by women of colour and Born N Bread, a collective of friends from south London who throw some of the best nights out in the capital.

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